Community News

A chance to make a difference!

Join Us to protect Joshua Tree National Park

Dear Friends,

This matters:

We have a unique and positive opportunity to protect our National Park that is decades in the making. The National Park Service is holding a meeting to discuss the future of the Eagle Mountain region. As you well know, many of us have fought for decades to oppose and finally defeat the horrible Eagle Mountain landfill. Now we have an opportunity to finish the job by adding the lands in question back to the Park, and standing together against the Eagle Crest Pumped Storage project. We need you support on this important opportunity to protect the park from threats and protect important historical and wildlife values in perpetuity! The region is important habitat for desert bighorn sheep, desert tortoise, and golden eagle, among many others.

Where: The National Park Service is holding a public scoping meeting on August 5 from 6pm-8pm at the Joshua Tree Community Center. We ask you to join us for this important conversation.

We will hold a pre-meeting from 4-5:30pm on August 5 to discuss the issue, opportunities, distribute talking points, and coordinate strategy at a location in Joshua Tree, CA. Snacks, drinks, and adult beverages will be provided. Please contact David Lamfrom (dlamfrom@npca.org) to rsvp and be provided the address.

For friends in the Coachella Valley, a meeting is being held the following night, August 6 from 6pm-8pm at the University of California Riverside in Palm Desert. Contact David Lamfrom for talking points. A pre-meeting can be arranged in the Coachella Valley if needed.

For those who cannot attend the meeting in person, we request that you attend the online meeting on July 29, 2015 from 1:30pm-3pm. Contact David Lamfrom for talking points to support your participation in that online meeting.

More information is available at the park website: http://parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm…


National Parks Conservation Association

California Desert Coalition

Morongo Basin Conservation Association

Joshua Tree National Parks Association

Joshua Tree Community Association

Joshua Tree Community Association's photo.

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posted Sep 25, 2012, 10:44 AM by JTCA Contact   [ updated Jul 28, 2015, 11:21 PM by S Swalberg ]


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posted Sep 19, 2012, 4:53 PM by JTCA Contact   [ updated Jul 28, 2015, 11:22 PM by S Swalberg ]


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posted Sep 15, 2012, 1:51 PM by JTCA Contact   [ updated Jul 28, 2015, 11:23 PM by S Swalberg ]


Jeff Ohlfs Named to Top Ranger Position at Joshua Tree National Park

posted Sep 8, 2012, 12:22 AM by JTCA Contact

The National Park Service has appointed veteran ranger, Jeff Ohlfs, to be the new Chief of Visitor and Resource Protection, or Chief Ranger, at Joshua Tree National Park. Ohlfs replaces retired Joshua Tree Chief Ranger Judy Bartzatt. Joshua Tree’s new Chief Ranger will oversee a staff of thirty employees engaged in law enforcement, fire, search & rescue, emergency services, fee collection, and managing special park uses. Joshua Tree National Park is approximately 794,000 acres in size and is visited by more than 1.4 million people per year.

Joshua Tree’s new Chief Ranger is a 33-year parks veteran. He has had assignments at a wide variety of national park sites including Pinnacles National Monument, Redwood State National and State Parks, Crater Lake National Park, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park, Hot Springs National Park, and Lake Meredith National Recreation Area. During his career, Ohlfs has served in a variety of capacities including District Ranger, Safety Officer, Fire Crew Boss, All-Risk Incident Commander, Law Enforcement Specialist, Fee Manager, Resource Manager, Emergency Medical Technician, Search & Rescue Technician, Wilderness Manager, Equal Opportunity Counselor, Historian, and Park Interpreter.

Ranger Ohlfs’ most recent position was as the Cottonwood District Ranger at Joshua Tree where he supervised ranger operations for nearly 80% of the park’s lands. Ohlfs knows the park extremely well having worked at Joshua Tree for the last 21 years.

Ranger Ohlfs’ personal interests include national parks around the world and the community of international rangers. He is very active in international park protection and is a current member of World Commission on Protected Areas. Ohlfs is an avocational historian and has written several articles on the history of Joshua Tree National Park. A third-generation Californian, Joshua Tree’s new Chief Ranger is a graduate of Humboldt State University. He and his wife Deb reside in Twentynine Palms, California.

Fire Crews Begin Second Day Battling Quail Fire

posted Aug 13, 2012, 1:13 PM by JTCA Contact

Firefighters began a second day fighting the Quail Fire at Joshua Tree National Park. The Quail Fire is located approximately 2.5 miles northwest of the Keys View Scenic Overlook within Joshua Tree National Park. The fire is burning through rocky hillsides covered with pinyon pine, junipers, and Joshua trees. As of 6:00 a.m. Monday morning, the fire had burned an estimated 250-300 acres. Park officials have closed the Keys View Road, a one-way scenic drive, between Cap Rock and the Keys View Overlook to allow the area to be used for firefighting personnel and equipment.

A total of 97 firefighters are working the fire this morning. Air resources include an air attack fixed wing aircraft. Two helicopters have been ordered to carry out water drops. Seven fire engines are tasked to the Quail Fire with two more engines on order. Two hand crews totaling 30 firefighters are working the fire with two more crews on order. Additional resources requested include a Safety Officer and two Emergency Medical Technicians. Agencies supporting the Quail Fire include the California Department of Forestry (Cal Fire), the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Forest Service (San Bernardino National Forest), the Morongo Valley Fire Department, and the National Park Service.

Objectives for firefighters today include 1) tying to tie in a fire line along the south edge of the fire where it is burning in rocky, tree- and brush-covered slopes, 2) firefighter safety, and 3) preservation of wilderness resources.

Over the weekend, a total four lightning-strike fires ignited in the park– three in the Covington Flats area on the west side of the park, and the Quail Fire. Due to quick, aggressive response by fire crews, the Covington Flats fires were all fully contained by Sunday with the largest reaching one-half acre in size.

Apart from the Keys View Road, all park roads and visitor facilities are open for normal summer use. The weather forecast for today calls for hot temperatures (100+ degrees) with occasional local thunderstorm activity.

Park visitors should be alert to potential flash flood activity in desert washes and low-lying areas. The public is urged to follow all signs and safety directions from park rangers and other emergency personnel.

For further updates on the Quail Fire, please visit the park’s website at: http://www.nps.gov/jotr. Additional press updates will be issued throughout the duration of the fire.

Fire Crews Battle Quail Fire at Joshua Tree National Park

posted Aug 13, 2012, 12:45 PM by JTCA Contact   [ updated Aug 13, 2012, 12:46 PM ]

Lightning from summer thunderstorms ignited a wildfire on Sunday afternoon at Joshua Tree National Park. The Quail Fire is located approximately 3.5 miles northwest of the Keys View Scenic Overlook within Joshua Tree National Park. Fire crews mobilized quickly to fight the blaze which is burning at a moderate pace through rocky hillsides covered with pinyon pine, junipers, and Joshua trees. As of 6:30 p.m., the fire had burned an estimated 125-150 acres. Park officials have closed the Keys View Road, a one-way scenic drive, between Cap Rock and the Keys View Overlook to allow the area to be used for firefighting personnel and equipment.

Resources tasked to the fire on Sunday evening include three air tankers and one helicopter to provide air support. Ten fire engines, one water tender, and two hand crews have also been assigned to the fire. More than 100 firefighters are working the Quail Fire this evening. Aaron Kendall of the National Park Service is the Incident Commander. A partial list of agencies supporting the fire includes firefighters from the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and Cal Fire.

Apart from the Keys View Road, all park roads and visitor facilities are open for normal summer use. Current weather conditions are hot with occasional local thunderstorm activity. Visitors should be alert to flash flood activity in desert washes and low-lying areas. The public is urged to follow all signs and safety directions from park rangers and other emergency personnel.

For further updates on the Quail Fire, please visit the park’s website at: http://www.nps.gov/jotr. Additional press updates will be issued throughout the duration of the fire.

FIRE TAX BILLS BEING SENT OUT!

posted Aug 3, 2012, 7:40 AM by JTCA Contact

If you are affected by the fire “fee”, beginning this month, the Board of Equalization will be sending out bills for the "Fire Prevention Fee" – to rural homeowners in areas where the state is responsible for fire protection. Michelle Steel the Vice Chair of the California State Board of Equalization has sent out the following information on steps that can be taken to object to the bill
Victoria Fuller
JTCA

This new tax violates Proposition 26, which was passed by voters in 2010 and requires that any fee or tax that broadly benefits the public be passed by a two-thirds vote of the Legislature. The fire "fee" was passed by only a simple majority. Just as bad, it will do nothing to increase fire-fighting services in California, but only provide educational and fire prevention services, at a time when state firefighting funds are being dramatically reduced.

Although the BOE is required to send the billings, it is not the agency in charge of administering this tax. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CalFire) is responsible for selecting the homeowners who are subject to the new tax and for processing appeals.

Nearly 827,000 homeowners in 31 million acres of State Responsibility Areas will receive bills between August and December. The bills, which will cost $150 with a $35 reduction for those who live in local fire service districts, will be sent alphabetically by county.

Before receiving a bill in the mail, homeowners will get a "pre-billing" notice to let them know that a bill is on its way.

Homeowners who receive fire tax bills and believe they have been billed in error must file timely petitions for redetermination with CalFire, or file timely claims for refund if they have paid the tax. Homeowners who believe the "Fire Prevention Fee" is unconstitutional must also file timely petitions for redetermination or claims for refund in order to preserve their rights and obtain adjudication of the constitutional issues.

CalFire has set up a website and phone number dedicated to this fee: (888) 310-6447, and www.FirePreventionFee.org. Taxpayers can use this resource to find more information on the tax and for petitions for redetermination.

As always, I am honored to serve as your taxpayer advocate. If I can be of any assistance, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Yours truly,
Michelle Steel
Vice Chair
California State Board of Equalization

Urgent Action Needed - Hearing June 20 – Senators Joel Anderson and Mark Wyland are amending SB 162 to read “A state agency shall not oppose a fee-to-trust land acquisition application” when the stated purpose is for “housing, environment protection or cultural preservation.”

posted Jun 15, 2012, 6:24 PM by JTCA Contact

This means if the 29 Palms Band of Mission Indians say their proposed trust transfer is for the purpose of “housing, environmental protection or cultural preservation” the State agencies would then not be able to oppose the transfer. But once it is sovereign land, the tribe could then change their mind and build a casino at any time.

State agencies work together for the purpose of protecting the resources of the state. This bill means agencies such as Cal Trans or State Highway Patrol could not say that a big development would impact our highway.

We need to make phone calls, send letters, and write emails opposing SB 162. Better yet go to Sacramento on June 20th to testify.

Your letter can be as simple as:

Please list Your Organization/our your name in opposition to SB 162. SB 162 Proposes to abdicated California’s responsibilities to all California citizens to benefit tribal entities. The bill would prohibit a state agency from opposing specified fee-to-trust land acquisition applications. (c) A state agency shall not oppose a fee-to-trust land acquisition application that is for the purpose of housing, environmental protection, or cultural preservation. A fee-to-trust land acquisitions can greatly impact local communities and we should NOT be giving up any of the already meager oversight that the State of California currently maintains.

Thank you,

To have your letter included in the Bill’s analysis fax your letter to:

Assembly Member Isadore Hall III, Chair of the Governmental Organization Committee

916.319.3979 fax

The bill analysis will then list your group in opposition.

Here is listed all of the members of the Government Organizations Committee. An email or phone call to all of them will make a difference. Our representative Paul Cook is on the committee.

Assembly Member Paul Cook (Dist. 65)
(He sits on the Governmental Organizations Committee and will be voting on this bill)

Room 5164
Sacramento, CA 94249-0065
(916) 319-2065

Or
34932 Yucaipa Boulevard
Yucaipa, CA 92399
(909) 790-4196

Committee on Governmental Organization

Committee Jurisdiction: Primary jurisdictions include alcohol, Indian gaming, horseracing, gambling, tobacco, public records, open meetings laws, state holidays, outdoor advertising and emergency services/natural disasters (this can be shared with the Housing and Community Development Committee and Local Government Committee)

Committee Members

District

Office & Contact Information

 Isadore Hall III - Chair

 Dem - 52

Contact Assembly Member Isadore Hall III

Capitol Office

P.O. Box 942849, Room 3123, Sacramento, CA 94249-0052; (916) 319-2052

 Brian Nestande - Vice Chair

 Rep - 64

Contact Assembly Member Brian Nestande

Capitol Office

P.O. Box 942849, Room 4139, Sacramento, CA 94249-0064; (916) 319-2064

 Toni Atkins

 Dem - 76

Contact Assembly Member Toni Atkins

Capitol Office

P.O. Box 942849, Room 4146, Sacramento, CA 94249-0076; (916) 319-2077

  Marty Block

 Dem - 78

Contact Assembly Member

Capitol Office

P.O. Box 942849, Room 3091, Sacramento, CA 94249-0078; (916) 319-2078

 Bob Blumenfield

 Dem - 40

Contact Assembly Member Bob Blumenfield

Capitol Office

P.O. Box 942849, Room 6026, Sacramento, CA 94249-0040; (916) 319-2040

 Wesley Chesbro

 Dem - 1

Contact Assembly Member Wesley Chesbro

Capitol Office

P.O. Box 942849, Room 2141, Sacramento, CA 94249-0001; (916) 319-2001

 Paul Cook

 Rep - 65

Contact Assemblyman Paul Cook

Capitol Office

P.O. Box 942849, Room 5164, Sacramento, CA 94249-0065; (916) 319-2065

Cathleen Galgiani

Dem - 17

Contact Assembly Member Cathleen Galgiani

Capitol Office

P.O. Box 942849, Room 5155, Sacramento, CA 94249-0017; (916) 319-2017

  Martin Garrick

 Rep - 74

Contact Assemblyman Martin Garrick

Capitol Office

P.O. Box 942849, Room 2158, Sacramento, CA 94249-0074; (916) 319-2074

 Mike Gatto

 Dem - 43

Contact Assembly Member Mike Gatto

Capitol Office

P.O. Box 942849, Room 4140, Sacramento, CA 94249-0043; (916) 319-2043

 Jerry Hill

 Dem - 19

Contact Assembly Democratic Caucus Chair Jerry Hill

Capitol Office

P.O. Box 942849, Room 3160, Sacramento, CA 94249-0019; (916) 319-2019

 Kevin Jeffries

 Rep - 66

Contact Assemblyman Kevin Jeffries

Capitol Office

P.O. Box 942849, Room 5128, Sacramento, CA 94249-0066; (916) 319-2066

 Fiona Ma

 Dem - 12

Contact Assemblywoman Fiona Ma

Capitol Office

P.O. Box 942849, Room 3173, Sacramento, CA 94249-0012; (916) 319-2012

 Henry T. Perea

 Dem - 31

Contact Assembly Member Henry T. Perea

Capitol Office

State Capitol, Room 4112, Sacramento, CA 94248-0001; (916) 319-2031

 V. Manuel Peréz

 Dem - 80

Contact Assembly Member V. Manuel Peréz

Capitol Office

State Capitol, Room 4117, Sacramento, CA 94248-0001; (916) 319-2080

 Jim Silva

 Rep - 67

Contact Assembly Member Jim Silva

Capitol Office

State Capitol, Room 2170, Sacramento, CA 94249-0067; (916) 319-2067

 Norma J. Torres

 Dem - 61

Contact Assembly Norma Torres

Capitol Office

State Capitol, Room 4161, Sacramento, CA 94249-0061; (916) 319-2061

 

 

      Ill-considered language is highlighted below.

 

 

BILL NUMBER: SB 162    AMENDED

        BILL TEXT

 

        AMENDED IN ASSEMBLY  MAY 21, 2012

        AMENDED IN ASSEMBLY  APRIL 30, 2012

        AMENDED IN SENATE  MAY 16, 2011

        AMENDED IN SENATE  APRIL 25, 2011

        AMENDED IN SENATE  MARCH 29, 2011

 

INTRODUCED BY    Senator   Anderson

 Senators   Joel Anderson   and Mark Wyland

 

    (   Coauthor:   Assembly Member  

Garrick   )

 

                       

   An act to amend Section 11019.8 of the Government Code, relating

to economic development.

 

 

        LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST

 

 

   SB 162, as amended, Anderson. Economic  Development

 development  : federally recognized Indian

tribes.

   Existing law encourages and authorizes all state agencies to

cooperate with federally recognized California Indian tribes on

matters of economic development and improvement for the Indian

tribes. Existing law provides that cooperation by state agencies with

federally recognized California Indian tribes on those matters may

include certain activities, including, among others, providing

information on programs to assist Indian tribes.

   Existing federal law requires the Secretary of the Interior to

publish a list of all federally recognized Indian tribes in the

federal register.

   This bill would add to the nonexclusive list of topics that state

agencies may cooperate with federally recognized Indian tribes

by  consulting  on a government-to-government basis, in a

respectful and meaningful manner,  with respect to  the

transfer of fee land into federal trust status. This   a

fee-to-trust land acquisition application, as specified  .

The bill would prohibit a state agency from opposing specified

fee-to-trust land acquisition applications.   The  bill

would define a federally recognized Indian tribe as a tribe

appearing on the list published by the Secretary of the Interior.

   Vote: majority. Appropriation: no. Fiscal committee: yes.

State-mandated local program: no.

 

 

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

 

  SECTION 1.  Section 11019.8 of the Government Code is amended to

read:

   11019.8.  (a) All state agencies, as defined in Section 11000, are

encouraged and authorized to cooperate with federally recognized

California Indian tribes on matters of economic development and

improvement for the Indian tribes.

   (b) Cooperation by state agencies with federally recognized

California Indian tribes may include, but need not be limited to, all

of the following:

   (1) Providing information on programs available to assist Indian

tribes.

   (2) Providing technical assistance on the preparation of grants

and applications for public and private funds, and conducting

meetings and workshops.

   (3) Any other steps that may reasonably be expected to assist

Indian tribes to become economically self-sufficient.

   (4) Consulting  on a government-to-government basis, in a

respectful and meaningful manner,  with respect to  the

transfer of fee land into federal trust status, particular when the

acquisition is  a fee-to-trust land acquisition

application that is  for the purpose of housing, environmental

protection, or cultural preservation.

   (c) A state agency shall not oppose a fee-to-trust land

acquisition application that is for the purpose of housing,

environmental protection, or cultural preservation.  

   (c)

    (d)  Cooperation by state agencies on economic

development and improvement for federally recognized California

Indian tribes, as described in this section, shall not be construed

to include activities that promote gambling.

   (d)

    (e)  For purposes of this code, or any other California

law, "federally recognized tribe" means a tribe that appears on the

list of Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible to Receive Services

from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs, published pursuant

to Section 479a-1 of Title 25 of the United States Code.

Action Alert: Protect our national parks, wilderness and other sensitive lands by attending the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan Meeting in Ontario, California on April 26, 2012!

posted Apr 20, 2012, 9:33 AM by JTCA Contact   [ updated Apr 20, 2012, 9:43 AM ]

Please join California Desert Coalition and the National Parks Conservation Association for a free ride to the meeting! See details below!

Dear Friends,

The Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan is a comprehensive process to identify which lands in the California desert should be protected and which lands will be open to renewable energy development. This renewable energy plan will have profound impact on the character of our communities and the ecological integrity of our national parks, wilderness and other protected areas. On April 26, 2012, stakeholders will be able to review different scenarios for renewable energy development in the California desert and make public comments to better protect the communities and lands we love.

Several of the proposed alternatives will highlight opportunities for protecting recreational opportunities and plant and animal habitat in the California desert while other alternatives will be focused on maximizing renewable energy development. We want desert residents to let decision makers know that we care about our desert lands, will support alternatives that maximize conservation and will oppose renewable energy in inappropriate areas. (Please see attached talking points.)

California Desert Coalition and the National Parks Conservation Association invite the public to reserve a seat on a 12 passenger van we are renting to drive to this event. Please send Seth Shteir an e-mail (sshteir@npca.org) to reserve your place! Spaces available on a first come, first served basis!

Have a great weekend!

Respectfully,
Ruth Rieman
California Desert Coalition

Seth Shteir
National Parks Conservation Association

NPCA Van Information:

The Van will leave from NPCA office (61325 Twentynine Palms Hwy., Suite D- Joshua Tree, CA) at 11:00am and will return to Joshua Tree at approximately 8:30pm on April 26, 2012. Attendees are encouraged to bring a bag lunch and are welcome to eat on our way to the meeting!

Meeting Location:

Ontario Convention Center (Please see directions at www.ontariocc.com/ontario/directions)

Meeting Agenda:

1:15 – 2:45 pm Develop Summary of the Concurrent Interactive Breakout Sessions for presentation to the full DRECP Stakeholder meeting
2:45 – 3:00 pm Break
3:00 – 4:00 pm Summary presentations from breakout sessions
4:00 – 4:30 pm Public Comment

Desert Renewable Energy Plan Talking Points:

  • We support the alternative (The alternative will be identified at the meeting) that protects the core of the Mojave Desert by connecting national park units and wilderness with other conservation lands. These lands are the connective tissue of the California desert that ensures the ecological health of her wildlife and plant populations. This alternative also focuses development on previously disturbed lands and near existing transmission corridors.
  • Multiple stakeholders, environmental groups and land management agencies have made significant conservation investments in the proposed Sand to Snow National Monument and surrounding region. A grassroots campaign to raise the awareness about the value of these conservation lands led to the defeat of the ill conceived Green Path North project. This broad based effort should be honored in regional land use planning and therefore these lands are not appropriate for renewable energy development.We support the protection of critical wildlife corridors and natural processes between Joshua Tree National Park and the Palen-McCoy and Chuckwalla Wildernesses. Additionally, we urge the preservation of air quality and scenic viewsheds beyond these sensitive areas’ designated boundaries.
  • We support the protection of all lands identified in the proposed California Desert Protection Act of 2011. The aforementioned designated lands should be excluded from renewable energy development.
  • We urge the selection of an alternative that protects the character and recreational tourism economies of gateway communities throughout the California desert. Renewable energy development has the potential to adversely impact recreational opportunities, air quality, scenic viewsheds, ecological corridors and rare and sensitive species- the very things that attract tourists to the California desert. A thorough study and analysis of how renewable energy will impact recreational tourism in the California desert must be included in this plan.
  • New ACECs should be created that permanently protect sensitive habitats like sand transport corridors, riparian habitats, wildlife habitat, wildlife corridors, cultural resources and recreational opportunities. Any plan must further identify sensitive areas and permanently protect these fragile resources.
  • National Park and wilderness viewsheds must be protected from renewable energy development outside the boundaries of these protected areas. Viewshed protection must not only be oriented inside the boundaries of a national park or designated wilderness, but consideration must be given to viewsheds beyond their boundaries.
  • More research must be conducted on desert soils and soil crusts as a carbon sink to better understand the role of natural desert processes related to climate change. These soils may be a considerable carbon sink to offset increased CO2 levels and therefore blading or destroying these soil processes diminishes our ability to buffer ourselves from the worst impacts of climate change. (Look up research by Lynn Fenstermaker of University of Nevada).
  • More research is needed on the ecological value of riparian and wash habitat that serve as critical wildlife habitat and wildlife linkages. As renewable energy development areas are designated, there needs to be additional criteria within these zones to minimize impacts on ecological processes, wildlife connectivity and wildlife habitat.
  • Renewable energy projects that could adversely impact groundwater resources, such as contributing to overdraft conditions of an aquifer, should be subject to additional review.
  • There is concern that there has not been sufficient tribal consultation on cultural resources and information gathered to adequately protect historic and archaeological resources in the California desert. Predictive archaeological modeling, which could identify archaeological sites, should be incorporated into any future renewable land use plan.
  • Surveys for rare plants must be conducted on a multi-year basis and include at least one wet spring and one wet fall.

Dear CDC Supporters,

It's been a while since we've been in touch and asked for your action. Your response to a call has been important in the past and is needed now.

Please plan to attend the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan Meeting in Ontario, California on April 26, 2012. The message below from NPCA and CDC gives you details about why this meeting is important and how you may participate. If you live in the Morongo Basin a free ride will be provided.

Let's show the DRECP stakeholders that their decisions are important to us.

Sincerely,
Ruth Rieman
CDC Vice Chair
www.cadesertco.org


Joshua Tree Municipal Advisory Council Agenda for Thursday, April 19, 2012

posted Apr 18, 2012, 10:58 AM by JTCA Contact   [ updated Apr 18, 2012, 11:00 AM ]

JOSHUA TREE MUNICIPAL ADVISORY COUNCIL
6171 SUNBURST AVENUE, JOSHUA TREE, CA 92252
760-366-8415
 
REGULAR MEETING AGENDA
THURSDAY, April 19th, 2012
7:00 PM

1. Call to Order
2. Pledge of Allegiance
3. Roll Call
4. Call for public comment on any items not on the agenda
5. Approval of the March 15th, 2012 Meeting Minutes
6. MAC Subcommittee Reports
7. COMMUNITY UPDATES

FIRE DEPARTMENT
John Salvate, Division Chief

MORONGO BASIN AMBULANCE ASSOCIATION
Ramon Lomeli, General Manager

SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT
Capt Donnie Miller, Morongo Basin Sheriff’s Station

CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROL
Lt Tim Tompkins, Commander, Morongo Basin Area
8. County of San Bernardino 3d District Desert Communities Update- Field Representative—Alan Rasmussen
9. Comments by Members of the MAC
10. Time and Date of next meeting – 7:00 pm, Thursday, May 17th, 2012
11. Adjournment

Tammie Moore
Recreation Assistant
760-366-8415 office
Tammie.Moore@sdd.sbcounty.gov

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